Clubs, Kennels & Registrars


   

A Dog Breed Club is an independent association (group) of people (committee) who ‘fancy’ a particular breed of dog.

   Breed Clubs are responsible for creating, documenting and presenting their own ‘Breed Standard’ for such breed. This standard exists to “support the preservation and protect” the club’s breed. Registration club members agree to a code of ethics overseen by it’s committees and (attempt) to promote the benefits of their breed through hosting dog shows and seminars.

   Local clubs are part of a National Registration Club, such as the AKC (American Kennel Club). Most countries have one National Kennel Club, which is responsible for maintaining all of the records of all their registered dogs in each individual breed. If the dog breed club writes or changes the standard for their particular breed, they submit their new or revised standard to their National Kennel Club, which is either adopted as standard or denied. If the new standard is adopted, it becomes the new Breed Standard of such National Kennel Club.

    Most Dog Breed Clubs are reserved to those who show their dogs due to their many strict rules and requirements.



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Clubs &  Kennels


   

  Local clubs are part of a National Registration Club, such as the AKC (American Kennel Club). Most countries have one National Kennel Club, which is responsible for maintaining all of the records of all their registered dogs in each individual breed. If the dog breed club writes or changes the standard for their particular breed, they submit their new or revised standard to their National Kennel Club, which is either adopted as standard or denied. If the new standard is adopted, it becomes the new Breed Standard of such National Kennel Club.

    However, the Breed Clubs claim to “preserve and protect” is irrelevant in reality. Neither the dog breed clubs nor the national kennel clubs can prevent the breeding of any dog or dogs that do not meet their ‘Breed Standard’. Anyone with a registered purebred dog or dogs can be a breeder. In other words, if your dog is registered or registerable, there is no indication and no guarantee that your dog has met the breed standard set forth by the National Kennel Club it is registered to. National Kennel Clubs do not have control over which dog or dogs can be bred or should not be bred; they only have control over which dogs are winning at their own National Dog Shows, such as Westminster Dog Show. In addition, just because a dog is a breed group or national dog show winner, it doesn’t guarantee that such dog is free from a hereditary disease or that such dog will not pass on recessive hereditary genes to it’s offspring.

   National Kennel Clubs depend on revenue to survive. Revenue is generated by dog shows, breed trials and registrations, with an emphasis on registrations. The more dogs that are registered, even if they are strictly pets and will never enter a show ring, the more revenue is gained by the National Kennel Clubs. For this reason, many dogs are bred and sold all over the world, and new puppy owners are urged to register their dogs for one (so-called) benefit or another.

   Unfortunately, massive puppy producing kennels, called Puppy Mills, have emerged to produce as many dogs as possible without regard to health, conformation or disease, in order to turn a profit on their “property” being sold.

   Thus, Mass Breeding Kennels, such as The Hunte Corporation is Goodman, Missouri, has produced many variations of each individual breed. A purebred dog may look like a cross-bred, and stray severely from the ‘Breed Standard”, but such dog(s) will continue to be bred regardless of conformation or health in order to turn a high profit.  These are the puppies that  are sold to Pet Stores across the USA. Often these dogs are registered under the wrong breed because 10-20 dogs are housed together, again - to produce a lot of puppies in a short time for high profit. Silky Terriers registered as Yorkshire Terriers, Collies as Shetland Sheepdogs and so on.

   In conclusion, just because your dog is registered or registerable to a kennel Club, it does not mean that your dog is of good (better) quality, health, conformation or temperament. Unfortunately, it doesn’t mean a damn thing.


What are Kennel Clubs or Dog Registrars?